Thank you for helping the Sports Legends Museum at Camden Yards determine the 10 most defining moments in Baltimore Ravens history.
Check back for the final top 10 list that will be part of an exhibit at the museum unveiled in late November. Voting is now closed, but you can still explore the original top 20 moments chosen by the Sports Legends Museum and The Baltimore Sun.
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Click on a thumbnail or use the controls below to explore the best of Ravens history. Voting is now closed, but be sure to check back for the final results.
Ravens win Super Bowl XXXV
On Jan. 28, 2001, the Ravens score three touchdowns within a 36-second span and defeat the New York Giants, 34-7, to win their first world championship in Super Bowl XXXV in Tampa, Fla. Jermaine Lewis returns a kickoff 84 yards for a touchdown and Duane Starks takes an interception back 49 yards for a score. Linebacker Ray Lewis is named the game’s Most Valuable Player.
(Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun)
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Ravens win Super Bowl XLVII
In a game pitting brother against brother, John Harbaugh’s Ravens defeat Jim Harbaugh’s San Francisco 49ers, 34-31, on Feb. 3, 2013 in New Orleans. Baltimore, which survives a power blackout and a 49ers comeback, gets a 108-yard kickoff return from Jacoby Jones and 287 yards passing (and three touchdowns) from quarterback Joe Flacco, the game’s MVP.
(Gene Sweeney Jr./Baltimore Sun)
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Ravens defeat Denver in first home playoff game on New Year’s Eve 2000
Tight end Shannon Sharpe’s twice-tipped 58-yard touchdown catch leads the Ravens past Denver, 21-3, in Baltimore’s first NFL playoff game in 23 years. It’s the eighth-straight victory for the soon-to-be world champions, who record five quarterback sacks of the Broncos (three by defensive end Michael McCrary) while stuffing the league’s No. 2 offense to win the wild-card game.
(John Makely/Baltimore Sun)
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Jamal Lewis’ single-game rushing record
Pro Bowl running back Jamal Lewis breaks the NFL single-game rushing record, churning out 295 yards and two touchdowns in Baltimore’s 33-13 victory over Cleveland on Sept. 14, 2003. Lewis busts through the Browns for runs of 82, 63 and 48 yards en route to breaking the old mark of 278 yards. For the season, he rushes for 2,066 yards, third-best all time, and is named NFL Offensive Player of the Year.
(John Makely/Baltimore Sun)
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Epic loss to New England in the 2012 AFC championship game
Late in the game, Ravens receiver Lee Evans is stripped of a catch in the end zone and kicker Billy Cundiff misses a 32-yard field goal attempt as Baltimore falls, 23-20, to the New England Patriots in the AFC championship game Jan. 22, 2012. It’s a heartbreaking setback for the Ravens, who finish 13-5 while making the playoffs for the fourth straight season under coach John Harbaugh.
(Gene Sweeney Jr./Baltimore Sun)
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Ray Rice converts a first down on fourth-and-29 in San Diego in 2012
“It was just total will,” Ravens running back Ray Rice says of his desperation catch-and-run for a first down on a fourth-and-29 play in San Diego on Nov. 25, 2012. Trailing 13-10 late in the game, the Ravens rally after Rice’s broken-field run, on which he slipped three tackles, to beat the Chargers in overtime, make the playoffs and, eventually, win the Super Bowl.
(Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun)
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Miracle Jacoby Jones touchdown catch against Denver in the 2012 playoffs
Trailing the favored Denver Broncos by seven points with 41 seconds left in an AFC divisional playoff, Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco lofts a bomb down the right sideline to Jacoby Jones, who beats two defenders, makes the catch and scores a 70-yard touchdown. Baltimore goes on to win it, 38-35 in overtime, and two games later celebrates a Super Bowl championship.
(Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun)
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Ravens defeat previously unbeaten San Diego on late touchdown in 2006
With 34 seconds left, quarterback Steve McNair hits tight end Todd Heap with a 10-yard scoring pass to defeat the Chargers, 16-13, giving the visiting Ravens a 4-0 mark for the first time in franchise history. Heap catches the ball just short of the goal line, breaks a tackle and bulls into the end zone. It’s the second-straight fourth-quarter comeback win for Baltimore.
(Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun)
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Ravens break Jacksonville jinx in 2000
“It was like we won the Super Bowl,” quarterback Tony Banks says after rallying Baltimore from a 17-point halftime deficit to beat Jacksonville, 39-36, on Sept. 10, 2000. It’s the home-standing Ravens’ first victory in nine tries against the Jaguars, thanks to Banks’ fifth touchdown pass of the day, a 29-yard toss to Shannon Sharpe with 41 seconds left in the game.
(Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun)
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Special teams spark Ravens over Denver on Monday Night Football
Chris McAlister returns a missed field goal 108 yards for a touchdown and Ed Reed blocks the first punt in Ravens history as Baltimore defeats the Broncos, 34-23, before a national-television audience in 2002. McAlister, whose return sets a record as the longest play in NFL history, delights the home crowd by holding the football over his head and taunting the Denver bench for the last 25 yards.
(Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun)
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Matt Stover’s leg keeps Ravens’ 2000 title drive alive
Stover is instrumental in Baltimore’s first Super Bowl run, scoring 49 points during a five-game stretch in which the Ravens fail to score a single touchdown. Dubbed “Mr. October” (he’s the only Raven to score all month), Stover wins two of those games by kicking four field goals in a 12-0 shutout at Cleveland and five more in a 15-10 victory at Jacksonville.
(Doug Kapustin/Baltimore Sun)
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Indianapolis boots favored Ravens from 2006 playoffs
In only the fourth playoff game in NFL history in which neither team scores a touchdown, Adam Vinatieri kicks five field goals as the Colts upset Baltimore, 15-6, at M&T Bank Stadium. The Ravens enter the game with a 13-3 record and the league’s top-rated defense. But in his first postseason appearance for the Ravens, quarterback Steve McNair throws two interceptions, fumbles once and is sacked twice.
(John Makely/Baltimore Sun)
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Ravens blow big lead, lose in Pittsburgh in 2010 divisional playoffs
Leading 21-7 at halftime, the Ravens collapse and fall to the hated Steelers, 31-24. It’s a bitter loss for Baltimore, which turns the ball over three times in the third quarter when running back Ray Rice fumbles and third-year quarterback Joe Flacco bobbles a center snap and throws an interception. The Ravens finish 13-5, having lost a playoff game for the third straight time in Pittsburgh.
(Kenneth K. Lam/Baltimore Sun)
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Ravens’ first NFL draft yields two future Hall of Famers
On April 20, 1996, the Ravens select UCLA offensive tackle Jonathan Ogden in the first round (fourth overall) of the NFL draft, and Miami linebacker Ray Lewis later in the first (26th overall). Ogden plays 12 years here, makes 11 Pro Bowls and is inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2013. Lewis retires in 2012 after 17 seasons, during which he earns first-team All-Pro honors seven times.
(Jeffrey Boan/AP)
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Hiring John Harbaugh and then drafting Joe Flacco and Ray Rice
On Jan. 19, 2008 the Ravens hire John Harbaugh, the relatively unknown special teams coordinator of the Philadelphia Eagles, as coach. Harbaugh helps oversee the drafting of quarterback Joe Flacco (Delaware) and running back Ray Rice (Rutgers) and, in his first season, leads the Ravens to an 11-5 finish, two upset victories in the playoffs and the AFC title game.
(Jed Kirschbaum/Baltimore Sun)
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The dominant 2000 defense
En route to winning the Super Bowl, the Ravens’ stingy defense sets the NFL 16-game record by allowing just 165 points, erasing the old mark of 187 set by the 1986 Chicago Bears. The 970 rushing yards allowed by the Ravens is also the fewest over 16 games in league history. Ray Lewis captures the 2000 Defensive Player of the Year award and earns MVP honors in Super Bowl XXXV.
(Doug Kapustin/Baltimore Sun)
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Jonathan Ogden’s induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame
On Aug. 3, 2013, Ogden is enshrined in Canton, Ohio, making him the Ravens’ first Hall of Famer to have played his entire career in Baltimore and the youngest inductee ever honored. A 6-foot-9, 345-pound offensive tackle, Ogden was the team’s first-ever draft pick in 1996 and a cornerstone of the 2000 Super Bowl champions. He was named to 11 Pro Bowls in a 12-year career.
(Kenneth K. Lam/Baltimore Sun)
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Ray Lewis announces retirement, helps Ravens defeat Colts in his last home game
On Jan. 2, 2013 – five days before the Ravens begin postseason play – linebacker Ray Lewis announces his retirement after having played 17 years in Baltimore. The Ravens respond with a 24-9 defeat of the Indianapolis Colts in an opening-round playoff game before an announced 71,379 at M&T Bank Stadium. Lewis lines up on offense for the final play and does a lap around the field at game’s end.
(Gene Sweeney Jr./Baltimore Sun)
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Team wins its first game as the Baltimore Ravens
After a 12-year absence, the NFL returns to Baltimore from Cleveland as the Ravens open on Sept. 1, 1996. Before a Memorial Stadium crowd of 64,124 fans, the Ravens rally to beat the Oakland Raiders, 19-14. Quarterback Vinny Testaverde scores the first touchdown on a 9-yard scramble, Matt Stover kicks two field goals and Earnest Byner scores on a 1-yard run in the fourth quarter.
(Kenneth K. Lam/Baltimore Sun)
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Opening of the new downtown football stadium
The Ravens christen their new $223 million home, Ravens Stadium at Camden Yards, with a 20-13 loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers on Sept. 6, 1998. Fireworks, bands and a sellout crowd of 68,847, including a host of dignitaries, are on hand to toast the red brick stadium that was for two years under construction. Pre-game ceremonies include a football presented by a man with a jet-propelled backpack.
(Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun)
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BALTIMORE SUN GRAPHIC [click to toggle credits]


APP DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT: Dana Amihere, Patrick Maynard & Adam Marton

REPORTING: Mike Klingaman

BALTIMORE SUN PHOTOS: Karl Merton Ferron, Lloyd Fox, Chiaki Kawwajiri, Doug Kapustin, Jed Kirschbaum, Kenneth K. Lam, John Makely, Elizabeth Malby, Algerina Perna & Gene Sweeney, Jr.

ADDITIONAL PHOTOS: Chris Graythen (Getty Images), Kirby Lee (USA TODAY Sports), Doug Pensinger (Getty Images), Patrick Semansky (Getty Images), Ezra Shaw (Getty Images), Ray Stubblebine (Reuters) & Rick Wilking (Reuters)

VIDEO NARRATION: Peter Jensen

VIDEO EDITING: Molly Geary & Steve Sullivan

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